Image of research area with tanks and seawater systems.

Research

The Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute (CMSI) coordinates and promotes new collaborative approaches to research that engage stakeholders and work to solve local, regional, and global challenges emerging in coastal systems.

Featured CMSI Research

Read about some of the long-term projects and innovative research being conducted on campus, in the field, and at our world-class research facility, the Bodega Marine Laboratory.



Sustainable Fishery Policy for a Resilient Future

Healthy ocean environments provide vital life support for roughly 3 billion people living in coastal communities worldwide. These vibrant ecosystems deliver numerous benefits to coastal communities that often rely on ocean industries such as commercial fishing for sustenance and income. The resilience of coastal communities and the fishing industry is an issue garnering global attention as fish stocks are pushed to the brink of collapse by combined pressures of overfishing, habitat destruction, pollution, and climate change.



The Effects of Stress on Fish: Environmental Physiology

Mandy Frazier, PhD student in the Ecology Graduate Group, collecting juvenile Antarctic fishes under the sea ice in McMurdo Sound.


Uncovering the Ecological Network in Bodega Bay

Stepping out onto the rocky shore of Bodega Bay, you would quickly notice that the intertidal zone is teeming with life. From mussels and barnacles to crabs and anemones, hundreds of species occupy these rocky areas - experts Jackie Sones and Dr. Eric Sanford estimate that there are about 250 different species that make their homes in this rocky intertidal zone in Bodega Bay!



Inside the Kueltz Lab at UC Davis

Dr. Kueltz’s background

Dr. Dietmar Kueltz describes himself as  “...a comparative biologist and most interested in mechanisms of stress-induced evolution. My lab studies how fish and marine invertebrates counteract environmental stress.” Originally from Berlin, Germany, he grew up interested in aquatic life. “I was diving and swimming a lot,” he said, “and I am interested in watersports and just about everything aquatic.” Dr. Kueltz attributes this early love of aquatics to his interest in studying stress and evolution in aquatic organisms.



Risky Business: Maintaining Economic and Ecological Balance in the Fishing Industry

As you gaze down at the piece of salmon sitting atop the sushi roll you just ordered, you may wonder: Where did this fish come from? Who caught it? How are there enough fish being caught to feed all of the other people who ordered a salmon sushi roll today? Will there be enough tomorrow as well? Despite pondering these questions for a few seconds, you probably shrug it off and delve into your delicious meal, not to think of it again until the next time you arrive at a sushi restaurant.



Species Resilience and Science Advocacy:

In the lab

Genetics, climate change, and conservation become highly intertwined in Dr. Andrew Whitehead’s lab. Although he works on a variety of research endeavors, he mainly focuses on how wild species respond to human-induced stress, such as the effects of climate change, and how that may affect an individual organism’s progeny. Essentially, Dr. Whitehead attempts to monitor how climate change and pollution will shape the genetic makeup of multiple generations.