Climate Change

Invasive Species and Climate Change Impact Coastal Estuaries

Native species in California’s estuaries are expected to experience greater declines as invasive species interact with climate change, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

The study, published in the Ecological Society of America’s journal, Ecology, said these declines are expected not only because of climate-related stressors, but also because of the expanding influence of new invasive predators whose impacts are occurring much farther up the estuary.

Sara Hamilton, Ph.D.

  • Postdoctoral Researcher
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences
  • Bodega Marine Laboratory
Bodega Marine Laboratory
University of California Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory, PO Box 247, 2099 Westshore Rd, Bodega Bay CA 94923

Samuel Walkes

  • Graduate Student
  • PhD Student
  • Graduate Group in Ecology
  • Evolution and Ecology
Bodega Marine Laboratory
University of California Davis, Bodega Marine Laboratory, 2099 Westshore Rd, Bodega Bay CA 94923

Survivors of Climate Driven Abalone Mass Mortality Exhibit Declines in Health and Reproduction Following Kelp Forest Collapse

Marine ecosystems are vulnerable to climate driven events such as marine heatwaves yet we have a poor understanding of whether they will collapse or recover. Kelp forests are known to be susceptible, and there has been a rise in sea urchin barrens around the world. When temperatures increase so do physiological demands while food resources decline, tightening metabolic constraints. In this case study, we examine red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) looking at sublethal impacts and their prospects for recovery within kelp forests that have shifted to sea urchin barrens.

Spotlight On: Leslie Guerrero

Coral reefs are foundational and iconic ecosystems that have long captivated many with their vibrant colors, interesting ecology, and ecosystem productivity. However, these beautiful reefs are facing their biggest challenge yet: climate change. How can immobile marine organisms, such as corals, survive and thrive in waters that are steadily warming? Leslie Guerrero, a PhD student in the Bay Lab at UC Davis, is working tirelessly to answer these questions.